Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita and the Merited-Response Argument

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Anna Głąb
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7980-3778

Abstract

In attempting to answer whether Nabokov’s Lolita can be described as an unethical novel, the author ponders on what basis one could make such a determination. At (1) the author analyzes the merited-response argument offered by Gaut (and previously Hume and Carroll), which provides a conceptual framework for the resolution of the controversy surrounding Lolita. Based on this analysis, (2) the author decides what constitutes the novel’s ethical foundation and what (3) prescriptions and (4) responses can follow from it.

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How to Cite
Głąb, Anna. (2021) 2021. “Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita and the Merited-Response Argument”. Diametros 18 (70):26-47. https://doi.org/10.33392/diam.1574.
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